Leiden, 25-06-2016

The Janki project.

Construction of another kindergarten has started. The pictures show a "puja" prayer service prior to the laying of the building's foundation. An important moment in the Hindu community.

The school's full name is Janki Early Childhood Development Centre, a long and hard to pronounce name, abbreviated to Janki ECD Centre. The kindergarten is located in a village called Banshkor and like the previous projects, this project is also in Kapilvastu, southwest Nepal. Here, too, he need for a school was great, as the children sat outdoors; too hot in warm weather; too cold in the cold months; and too wet in the monsoon.

Banshkor has about 200 households. The number of children for the class is 35, average number in most villages of this size. 17 boys and 18 girls from 3 years receive thier Primary Education in Nepali because that is the language of instruction in secondary education. Their mother tongue Awadhi is inadequate. The building is one classroom with the standard dimensions as prescribed by the Government in feet, which is converted 5:50 meters at nearly 7 meters. A bathroom is adjacent to the back of the building and there is a pump for clean drinking water.

Furthermore, the budget was earmarked for a carpet, cushions to sit on, some learning tools and toys. The property will be fenced in. The land for the project was donated by the VDC Village Development Committee and is registered with the Central Government in Kathmandu as the property of the school.

Our sincere and heartfelt thanks to everyone who has contributed to the creation of this building. If this school is taken into use at the end of the year, we are going to look forweard to the next project. The projects are not that hard, everywhere you have children in the open class, be it at kindergarten level or primary school for children aged six to twelve years.

There remains alot of work to be done and specifically the search for additional funding.

Kind regards,

Annette M. Donker

Nepal Sammaan Foundation

Dear friends and acquaintances,

It has been some months ago now that Nepal was severely affected by a series of earthquakes.

My request for donations in order to give some relief, received response in the form of 2700 €.

Thanks to all generous donors!

What was done with the money so far:

It was my wish that children should be able to go back to school on a daily basis.

For 250 children the local foundation Friends of Sankhu (since 1991 a relief organization in the Sankhu area) purchased schoolbags, stationary and writing materials.

The schoolbuilding in the picture is still standing but on the inside many repairs had to be carried out in order to be able to recommence school-sessions.

The children who were beneficiary to this program came from those families who had lost everything; who are still living in a tent or under tarpaulin and have not been able to restore their houses yet.

With their daily school-program the children not only receive education but also a sense of normalcy, of daily routine is slowly being restored.

Thank you again.

Foundation Nepal Sammaan gladly gave its support to Attie and Willem de Jong's (from Dordrecht) fund drive.

Together with their friends and acquaintances they sent enough money to Nepal, so that an entire village of 160 families could be provided with 25 kilos of rice per family. Rice stocks had become unusable through rubble and mud; and the next harvest is still months away.

Hunger and distress aleviated again for a group of people.

Fantastic result.

8-06-2015

Following the disasters that hit Nepal, a severe earthquake twice within a short period of time, a campaign has been started by a foundation. Resulting in just over 2000 euros collected.

Of which 1200,- has already been transferred, of course, to the foundation Friends of Sankhu in Sankhu.

1200 euros is the equivalent of 156,000 Nepalese rupees over—a sum that can allow many children can attend daily lessons again, albeit in a tent.

The website address of the Friends of Sankhu is www.fos.org.np

For many years this local foundation, co-founded by a Nepalese anthropologist who received his doctorate in Leiden, been active in their immediate environment and also now in the hardest hit part, Sindhupalchowk.

It is the intention and our wish that this money is spent on the restoration of daily education, purchasing chalkboards, textbooks, notebooks and writing pads and, if possible, cushions to sit on.

Once we get an accounting of the this money has been spent, it will be published here.

Many thanks to all those who gave generously.

Regards,

Annette Donker

Dear friends and acquaintances of the the foundation,

By now, everyone knows the news of what happened in Nepal. A major disaster. In addition to the loss of many lives and the grieving families, there is also the loss of cultural heritage. The tourist attraction, upon which the weak economy just about subsided, for lack of trade.

What is in store for Nepal? No one can envisage that yet.

In the region Kapilvastu, there is little or no destruction or loss of life. That means that our project has survived this disaster. I believe that it is correct to continue forward in the established manner: building for a strong, future generation by continuing to provide educational opportunities.

Hopefully I can continue to count on all of you.

Best regards,

Annette Donker

Blog

Annette Donker is committed to the children in Nepal. That is why she created the Nepal Sammaan foundation years ago. This foundation aims to reduce child labor in Nepal by providing education.The school building project, for which the fund drive is intended, was developed in collaboration with the community, which also provides all of the work. Donker: "The whole economy in Nepal is centered on child labor. You can not just change that with fund drives. This is definitely going to take two generations." Annette is convinced that you should involve both the children, the parents as well as the manufacturer, in change.

The completed construction of the school in the village of Gauri

Posted by adonker on Sunday, 1 February 2015.

Dear readers,

Last December, I went back to Nepal for the festive opening of the kindergarten in Gauri, a village about ten kilometers from Taulihawa (the local municipality). That does not sound far, as the crow flies, but over bad roads it takes a lot of time to get there. The welcome was heartwarming as usual: just about the entire village population met us and escorted us (three members of the Nepalese Organization SSDO and myself) to the school building in the middle of the village.

The school is a very spacious building and with a good toilet and a water pump on-site for clean drinking water. The kindergarten teacher was very pleased with the accommodations. She stressed that the work now would be so much nicer than in the open air (should the weather permit teaching). We handed the kids a metal box full of toys, so that not only the roof over the head was an improvement, but also the possibility to keep busy. With, among other things, dolls, toy cars and plastic parts to be fitted together.



For the festive event, tea was distributed for everyone and yhr children received biscuits. Another project to look back on with satisfaction. A thirteen year old girl from this village, who spoke English very well and gladly talked with me, told me that a Primary School was nearby (only 2 kilometers away from the village). Years ago, UNICEF built a primary school at a strategic location between the various villages on a junction of roads, so that the youth from the area never more than 2 to 3 kilometers have to walk for a good education. The children of the school Gauri can effortlessly transition to Primary Education.

Incidentally, on my way back to the airport (50 kilometers away) I saw a field with at least ten circles of students and the teacher in the middle. There is still plenty to do to get more children under roof for their daily lessons!

Many thanks to all who donated to this project to bring it to a successful conclusion.

Kind regards,

Annette Donker





Construction of the kindergarten in Guari

Posted by adonker on Monday, 19 May 2014.

Dear readers,

It's been a long time since I informed you about the construction of the kindergarten in Gauri, where children were taught under a tree.

First, the construction was delayed because the winter months there were (un-Nepalese) cold, then a lot of unexpected rainfall, and, finally, because the man who coordinated and managed the construction, Parshuram Yadav, spent a long time in Kathmandu due to a heart condition.

He is back in the bosom of his family and has taken up his duties again. His prognosis is that construction will be completed within months.

More good news is that interest was even expressed for the work of the foundation in America. A former fundraiser, who supports all sorts of initiatives with her blog, has written about our work. She raising awareness in the U.S. through other channels about our activities.

See lnspencer.wordpress.com

We would very much appreciate it if there were more regular donors. Payment information can be found under the heading 'donate'. More regular monthly donations, however small, give more certainty.

Enjoy the summer.

Kind regards,

Annette Donker

Lecture about Nepal by Annette M. Donker.

Posted by adonker on Friday, January 3, 2014

Nepal, the land between India and Tibet, is home to the highest peaks in the world, known as the Himalayas.

On the 21st of January, the foundation Women Now is organizing a lecture about Nepal to be held Annette M. Donker.

Annette Donker lived from early 1994 until the end of 1996 in Nepal, and then she traveled there up to 2003 as a tour guide, as well as North and South India, Bhutan, Ladakh and few African countries. Now, Nepal is her annual destination to visit the project that it supports through the Nepal Sammaan foundtion.

She will highlight aspects of the Nepalese society:

  • some religious festivals
  • the history of the Shah dynasty
  • impact of tourism
  • political impotence
  • importance of education in this developing country
  • the discrepancy between the rapid developments in the capital and lagging in parts of the country.
  • In 1960, Edmund Hillary already built a school with some volunteers in the village of Khumjung 4000 meters on the slopes of Mount Everest.

    The immediate reason for this building was a conversation he had with one of his Sherpas, a certain Urkien.

    "Tell us Urkien, if there were one thing we could do for your village, what should it be? I know you like a medical clinic and believe that your farms could be improved. But if you had one choice, what would it be?" "We would like our children to go to school, sahib! Of all things you have, learning is one we most desire for our children."

    Two years later, Hillary received a letter from a neighboring village with the touching preamble: 'Though our children have eyes, but still they are blind' with the request to also build a school in their village.

    Now 53 years later, the desire for good education - in a good safe environment - for their children is for underprivileged groups in Nepalese society still relevant.

    Besides giving an insight into the Nepalese society, Annette Donker will also explain the work of the young foundation Nepal Sammaan.

State of Affairs Nepal Sammaan Foundation

Posted by adonker on Monday, November 11, 2013

Small steps to eventual visible results, that is the message which I am giving now.

In January, after I attended at the festive inauguration of the first school built by the foundation, Ram Dulare, I can now report that the construction of the second kindergarten has started. Much later than intended, however, but the monsoon in Nepal this year was the longest in 35 years, as reported to me by my friends in Nepal. When the torrential rains finally ceased to ravage the country, the hurricane came that swept across India and made many victims, also in southern Nepal, in the Terai.

The secretary of the foundation who was planning on visiting the project, described how the roads were impassable, a mass of mud and uprooted trees and even some fatalities, and, therefore, was not able to reach the project. That's a pitty because I was hoping for better quality photos to mail around than those made by the local project lead with a much simpler device.





The foundation received a significant four year commitment from the Remonstrant Brotherhood, section Religion and Society. The first annual donation has already been received. We are very grateful for this financial injection.

The website was in need of improvement and worked on by Martinus Adèr, in addition to his busy job. Thank you Martinus.

The intention is that, if there is anything to report, I write a short blog about recent developments. On January 21 2014, I will make a presentation about Nepal in general and about the work of the foundation in particular to the members of "Women Now" in Prinsenbeek. A few days ago, I received the trailer of the promotional film about my journey in the Himalayas, from Switzerland. In this interview, I also show some of the work of the foundation and the end product the logo and the website be displayed. At moment, translations are being made of my spoken text in French, German and Italian, which are then "voiced over" in the process.

Although the real festive season is still ahead of us, I want wish each of you a good month with a lots of joy.

Greetings,

Annette Donker

Latest developments

Posted by adonker on Thursday, September 20, 2012

In order to generate funds, the founder of the Nepal Sammaan, Annette Donker, will organize a sponsor trek to the Mount Everest Base Camp in early 2013. The Mount Everest Base camp is located 5400 meters above sea level.

The important facts about this project are: local people from community in Kapilvastu do the work, the training and give the courses, provide guidance, do project development, monitoring and administration. Only the financal means come from elsewhere. That is where Nepal Sammaan comes into the picture. Of course, all expenditures are well controlled by the foundation.

In order to reach as many people, I ask everyone who visits my site to pass the word along the word to their family, friends, and colleagues about this unique initiative.

You can follow me on Twitter. Soon a safe and effective payment option will be available on the website.

Kapilvastu Project continued

Posted by adonker on January 13, 2012

A lot of news following my week long visit to Nepal. I visited many Nepalese friends and family. Focus is on funding the project in Kapilvastu to build a kindergarten, an Early Childhood Development (ECD) center. It is important to protect children early on from child labor and especially to teach them them the Nepali language. At home, only Awadhi (pronounced “OUDI”) is spoken and this makes the transition to primary education difficult, as Nepali is used for teaching. This way, by by fourth grade they are able to play in Nepali and can follow the lessons more easily.

The project has had a major setback, the English sponsor has withdrawn and a replacement has not been found. Thanks to the thrift of the auditor of the local NGO, SSDO, Sunshine Social Development Organization, the project is on the back burner for a while, but not for long.

There are hundreds of families, the Village Development Committe (VDC) and many Wards (hamlets) which belong to the central VDC. In other words, the extensive project as it flourished with dedication of many villagers should be kept on track. The various aspects have made a difference in everyday life: for example, 'training in child friendly teaching' a program for parents familiar with the negative effects of child marriage. The 27 youth clubs in 27 wards of 3 VDCs, where more than 600 children, 367 boys, 251 girls, develop their creativity by writing and editing wall newspapers, discussing politics, theater, voting etc.

Nepal Sammaan endeavors to raise new funds for this project. If you want to support this goal, you can make a donation to the account number mentioned on the front page of the website. A small monthly contribution makes a big difference to the lives of many.

Thank you,

Annette M. Donker

Completion of the school in Kapilvastu

Posted by adonker on September 25, 2011

The construction of the school in Kapilvastu has reached the final stage. It is expected to be ready in October, painted and with an attractive exterior and interior, i.e., furniture and toys.

The construction was made possible by a donation from Nepal Sammaan, but also the local population contributed 45,250 rupees, which is approximately 471 euros, a considerable amount for a poor, rural community. That shows just how involved they are in their own children's development and how much they can achieve when motivated.

The foundation decided to give the Kapilvastu project in its entirety back to the community. After years of training, the project can be further developed by the people themselves. Of course, with continuous monitoring and, where necessary, support from Pokhara. This way the foundation achieves maximum impact. A new project elsewhere in a very poor area will be started in the same way.

In late December, I traveled to Nepal primarily to visit my many friends again, and to view this school and consult with the Head Office in Pokhara as to which future projects are promising for the foundation. Meanwhile, I hope more people will donate, as there is more than enough work to be done.

Sincerely, Annette Donker, Nepal Sammaan Foundation.

School building in Kapilivastu almost completed

Posted by adonker on September 25, 2011

The construction of the school, intended for 30 preschoolers, is nearing completion. The majority of the finances have been donated by Nepal Sammaan, but the local population itself has also raised 471 euros, a considerable amount for a poor population. This shows just how involved they are and how much they want to be involved in their children's education. Presumably, the school can be opened in October, when the painting is finished.

The main office in Pokhara considers that local social networks to function so well after years of training that the entire project can be transferred to the community. The main office will continue to supervise and support, where needed, until they are completely self-supporting.

In the course of December, I will travel to Nepal, to visit friends and the school. A new project, set up the same way and with the same ingredients, elsewhere, now needs our help. This type of hands-on development represents the ideals of the Nepal Sammaan Foundation.

Your support is still needed!

Sincerely Annette Donker

Construction in full swing

Posted by adonker on June 17, 2011

From Nepal came the news that the construction of the nursery school is in full swing. The the village community has been working hard.

Some additional information: finances are handled by a major British organization in Pokhara. An accountant manages and audits the expenditures. Rabindra Das and a Dutch employee are my contacts there. Rabindra is also the man who provides training and on-site monitoring. He grew up here and as the son of a small farmer. He was able to pursue higher education and has subsequently worked his way through university. Two jobs to cover the costs of the study. He trains the teachers in child-friendly teaching. He trains social workers in the community about the importance of developmental education. All-in-all, a good project in which the local community has make a large contribution.

Two weeks in Nepal

Posted by adonker on May 9, 2011

In early April, I flew to Nepal to visit friends and to conduct discussions about a school in the Terai, located in the region Kapilvastu southwest of Pokhara. Pokhara is a tourist destination in the middle of the country. Many mountain journeys begin here. Specifically, the (in)famous AnnaPurna Trek.

The foundation is committed to building a nursery school for children of parents who have no opportunities to send their children to a 'private' school. Moreover, these 'private' schools are not accessible in remote villages like Ajigara VDC Ward No. 5. A VDC is a Village Development Committee, which includes several (sometimes 10 or 12) villages or hamlets. The nearest larger town (and that isn't saying really much) is Taulihawa. You can easily find on the map, but the VDC Ajigara is not on my map. When I visited the region two years ago, the trip from Taulihawa by a motorcycle was time consuming. Obviously, we couldn't always drive 80 kilometers per hour on a reasonably good road, because it was more plowing through narrow sandy paths. Only now and then did we reach a speed of 30/40 km. Then passages on a simple raft, or wading across a shallow river. Thus, the actual distance in kilometers from the village to the 'big' city, is indescribable. The feeling of distance is enormous.

The foundation is building a nursery school. The village is Ward n0 5, Nandnager, and 14 girls and 16 boys eagerly await a more robust shelter than the mud hut – without any facilities - they have now. Or, more likely, that the parents anxiously waiting for a better home for their three to five year olds. It is a building with 3 windows, a door, and a toilet! And a hand pump for clean water! The community itself is responsible for the building. The the materials were donated. Also, the Foundation shall provide good learning and play materials. The building will also be used for courses (which are already given) to parents. The community is very involved and committed to their children's good nursery education. Toddlers going to school means that they do not end up in a working and it is proven that once in a school system, the flow to 'elementary' education is almost a matter of course. The ECD (Early Childhood Development) is therefore of the utmost importance. To achieve the same in other villages (Wards in the region), monthly donations are welcome. More information can be found under the heading "Donations" on the home page of this website.